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the-exercist:

areyourfeelingshurt:

PFFHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHA

Pretty cool study, honestly:
“Rivera found that Latinos he studied were significantly more likely than whites to agree that negative stereotypes commonly used to describe Hispanics applied to them. The result suggested to Rivera that “somewhere in their heads they are making the connection that the stereotype is Latino, I am Latino, and therefore I am the stereotype.”
Hispanics in the study who strongly self-stereotyped were more than three times as likely to be overweight or obese as those who did not. The data suggest that self-stereotypes diminish self-esteem – and therefore the motivation that might have helped them follow a healthier lifestyle.
Rivera says demeaning stereotypes come from many sources. For instance, he says, television and other mass media frequently carry harmful messages, such as Latinos are lazy or Latinos are unintelligent. “And then,” he adds, “there are more subtle ways in conversations and interactions with others. Although people don’t say explicitly ‘you are A, you are B,’ there are ways in which those messages are communicated. It could be teachers. It could be your parents. It could be your friends.”
So how does a person discouraged by stereotypes overcome them? According to Rivera, research suggests that exposure to positive racial and ethnic role models might help. Something else worth trying, he says, could be designing approaches to weight loss that emphasize the person’s positive qualities – as a way to counteract the corrosive effects of prejudice.
“It has been shown that when you remind people what they’re good at, it works to immunize them from the effect of stereotypes,” Rivera says. “It releases their anxieties and allows them to focus on the task before them and perform to their ability.””
It’s almost like these researchers are confirming what we already know about self-esteem, racial prejudice, weight loss and body shaming - If you treat people badly, it’s going to affect their lives.
Oct 19, 2014 / 526 notes

the-exercist:

areyourfeelingshurt:

PFFHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHA

Pretty cool study, honestly:

Rivera found that Latinos he studied were significantly more likely than whites to agree that negative stereotypes commonly used to describe Hispanics applied to them. The result suggested to Rivera that “somewhere in their heads they are making the connection that the stereotype is Latino, I am Latino, and therefore I am the stereotype.”

Hispanics in the study who strongly self-stereotyped were more than three times as likely to be overweight or obese as those who did not. The data suggest that self-stereotypes diminish self-esteem – and therefore the motivation that might have helped them follow a healthier lifestyle.

Rivera says demeaning stereotypes come from many sources. For instance, he says, television and other mass media frequently carry harmful messages, such as Latinos are lazy or Latinos are unintelligent. “And then,” he adds, “there are more subtle ways in conversations and interactions with others. Although people don’t say explicitly ‘you are A, you are B,’ there are ways in which those messages are communicated. It could be teachers. It could be your parents. It could be your friends.”

So how does a person discouraged by stereotypes overcome them? According to Rivera, research suggests that exposure to positive racial and ethnic role models might help. Something else worth trying, he says, could be designing approaches to weight loss that emphasize the person’s positive qualities – as a way to counteract the corrosive effects of prejudice.

“It has been shown that when you remind people what they’re good at, it works to immunize them from the effect of stereotypes,” Rivera says. “It releases their anxieties and allows them to focus on the task before them and perform to their ability.”

It’s almost like these researchers are confirming what we already know about self-esteem, racial prejudice, weight loss and body shaming - If you treat people badly, it’s going to affect their lives.

(via backonpointe)

Oct 19, 2014 / 707,676 notes

darkfuse:

i want to meet myself from someone else’s point of view

(via jmartin423)

sparkhed:

  indie/bambi blog 
Oct 19, 2014 / 124,270 notes
Oct 19, 2014 / 423,044 notes

thatfunnyblog:

 

just comparing them. 

they are still zack and cody

(via jmartin423)

Oct 19, 2014 / 128,348 notes

Reblog if this is true for your blog.

demon-deans-meatstick:

superwholockphan:

yugi-muto:

six-foot-two-phanchild:

aganetah45:

image

I waited to reblog til i saw asexual. Thank youuu

I don’t even care if you’re sexually attracted to trees. 

If I’m ever not please tell me

I’m happy because they put bisexual >O<

(via n0t-quite-sp00py)

Oct 19, 2014 / 91 notes

(via femucla)

Oct 19, 2014 / 52,720 notes

(via kirstynhippe)

Oct 19, 2014 / 149,771 notes

taylorswift:

shakeitoffs:

do you ever just feel like

image

Omg all the time.

(via stickwithlove)

Oct 19, 2014 / 655,490 notes

songofsunset:

inventrix:

0trevskies:

When friends won’t believe they’re cute and perfect

image

when friends insist that you’re cute and perfect

image

shhhhhhhh you’re cute and perfect deal with it

image

(via jmartin423)

Oct 19, 2014 / 16 notes

Anonymous said: I really admire how much ballet is respected in Russia and I'm sure you experienced that while at the Bolshoi academy. I wish people felt the same way in America. Do you know why it is that way in Russia?

sometimes-im-a-ballerina:

yes i admire that so much as well! it was incredible to feel like people really understood and respected me for what i did over there, and it was very touching and inspiring. 
i think it’s just such a big part of their culture, and they really love to keep alive their old traditions. it’s very special to them! everyone from all walks of life had probably seen a live ballet at least once in their life, and it was respected by everyone. 
i really really wish that it was that way in america, too. for some reason nobody takes the arts very seriously over there. i find it so hard and pointless to dance classical ballet in the USA, because you know that the audience (even if they like the ballet) would probably clap at it even if it was the worst ballet of all time just because they have no idea what real classical ballet and technique is supposed to look like. it’s not their fault that art and especially the quality of the art is not prioritized in our culture! 
for example, here are two different examples of conversations i’ve had. one in russia, one in america. the people i was talking to asked me what i did: 
me: “i’m a ballet dancer”
Russian person: “oh wow! that’s wonderful! where did you study? who was your teacher? where are you from? where do you want to dance?”
American person: “oh wow! so what else do you do? like, what do you really do? how much money do dancers make? how do you plan to survive on that kind of a salary? are you anorexic? do pointe shoes hurt? so can you do the splits??